Roaring Forties Australian Blue

The cheese of the day was the King Island Dairy Roaring Forties Blue. Another discovery at a local grocery store, the Blue had the appearance (and name) of a typical American blue cheese, but had far less bite and an awesomely smooth texture that is hard to find in domestic varities that tend to be dry and crumbly. After I polished off the last bit this evening I searched for the King Island website and found this helpful description:

A full flavoured blue with a sweet, slightly nutty character and good aftertaste. A rindless cheese matured in wax thus retaining its moisture and creating a smooth and creamy texture. A Roquefort style mould is used to create this unique and exciting cheese style.

Mmmm. A really great cheese. A bit of googling uncovered a recent newspaper review in the San Francisco Chronicle, which might be related somehow to the appearance of the cheese at a local grocery that boasts of a selection of over 3,000 wines:

My favorite among those I’ve tasted is the Roaring Forties Blue, a creamy, mild, blue-veined cheese from pasteurized cow’s milk. Local retailers tell me it is a customer favorite, too. […] Under the wax, you’ll find a moist, smooth and creamy blue with a mellow, almost sweet taste. It has neither the saltiness nor the pungency that characterizes many blues, which probably accounts for its popularity. Its lush, velvety texture calls for an equally luscious wine. Lustau’s Rare Cream Sherry, Solera Superior, accompanies it beautifully.

I couldn’t (and didn’t) say it any better myself, especially since I’ve never heard of those wines. I can just imagine that groceries in the future will have “hyper-linked” food. For example, when you pick up a cheese and put it in your cart, the cart’s interface will alert you to the appropriate selection of crackers and wine. Talk about a powerful and ubiquitous commerce model for information…

In the meantime, does anyone ever taste cheese with bourbon?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.